Tag Archives: AgriLife Research

AgriLife Research to study prenatal stress impacts in cattle

Writer: Adam Russell, 903-834-6191, adam.russell@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Ron Randel, 903-834-6191, ron.randel@ag.tamu.edu OVERTON – A $382,800 federal grant will fund research to identify the impacts of prenatal stress on beef cattle DNA, white blood cells, other tissue and subsequent changes in genetics related to temperament, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist. Dr. Ron Randel, AgriLife Research physiologist, said the three-year grant will finance research focused on the “effect of prenatal stress on DNA methylation and correspondence with gene expression in cattle” at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in… Read More →

SXSW BBQ Panel Recap

Texas A&M’s South by Southwest panels look to the future Aggie offerings delve into the scientific issues behind human rights, health care…and BBQ By Steve Kuhlmann, steve.kuhlmann@theeagle.com Barbecue enthusiasts were treated to a more than 45-minute panel with the “brisketeers” — Texas A&M professor Jeff Savell, AgriLife Extension meat specialist Davey Griffin and Rosenthal Meat Center manager Ray Riley — and author and cook Jess Pryles, who shared with the audience some of the principles they look for in meat and how their interest has built a community… Read More →

Goals established for Texas A&M animal science beef programs

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Cliff Lamb, 979-845-1543, gclamb@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION — Over the past decade, dramatic weather changes such as drought and parasites have created a set of new challenges for Texas beef cattle producers. In response, Texas A&M University’s department of animal science head Dr. Cliff Lamb hopes to tap into scientists and specialists within the department and both Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service to find new, scientific innovations to help Texas’ beef cattle producers minimize both production and economic risks. Lamb… Read More →

Producer input needed for possible sore mouth pilot project in goats

AgriLife Researcher: Severe ‘orf’ cases appear to be increasing in West Texas Writer: Steve Byrns, 325-653-4576, s-byrns@tamu.edu Contacts: Dr. John Walker, 325-653-4576, jwalker@tamu.edu Dr. Reid Redden, 325-653-4576, Reid.Redden@ag.tamu.edu SAN ANGELO – With sore mouth cases in goats reportedly on the rise,Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center agencies in San Angelo will seek producer input on a possible study during a meeting March 1 at the center. The informational meeting, set for 2 p.m., is free and open to the public. The center is north of San Angelo on U.S. Highway 87. Dr…. Read More →

Texas A&M AgriLife, Colorado State team up for beef export project

University researchers developing industry best practices Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Russell Cross, 979-845-1541, hrcross@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Texas A&M AgriLife and Colorado State University researchers are teaming up to evaluate production practice risks to beef trade, develop educational materials and programs to assist producers with meeting requirements for exporting to China, and helping the U.S. beef industry capitalize on future export trade revenue. The U.S. Department of Agriculture-Foreign Agricultural Service has awarded Texas A&M Agrilife Research and Colorado State University $750,000 to develop the program. “One purpose… Read More →

What are big carcasses doing to the future of the beef industry?

Large carcasses are forcing retailers to cut more of the middle-meat steaks thinner to meet package and cost restrictions. Does that move the beef business away from consumer preferences? Commentary by Dr. H. Russell Cross, hrcross@tamu.edu, 979-862-1705 It’s a conundrum that has long plagued the beef business—what’s economically necessary for producers presents big challenges for wholesalers, retailers and most importantly, consumers. Over the past several decades, the genetic direction of the nation’s cowherd has been driving us to bigger and bigger cattle. That, in turn, drives bigger and… Read More →

Cattle Are “Up-Cyclers”

By: John Maday Among all the discussion about efficiency and sustainability in food production, beef’s critics often leave out a critical point—cattle eat things we cannot. They turn grass, corn stalks, wheat straw and byproducts such as distillers’ grains and cottonseed meal into high-quality protein for human consumption. While it also is true cattle eat products such as corn and soybean meal, which could be used in human diets, analysis indicates beef has a good story to tell regarding the ratio of human-edible nutrients invested to human-edible nutrients… Read More →

Smith, Forrest receive 2017 Vice Chancellor’s Awards in Excellence

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION –  Vice Chancellor’s Awards in Excellence honors were presented to several statewide faculty and staff of Texas A&M AgriLife during a ceremony Jan. 9 on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station. The awards, established in 1980, recognize the commitment and outstanding contributions of faculty and staff across Texas A&M AgriLife. “These awards represent the highest level of achievement for our organization,” said Dr. Mark Hussey, vice chancellor and dean of agriculture and life sciences at Texas A&M. “They recognize a… Read More →

Miller among four named Faculty Fellows by Texas A&M AgriLife Research

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Texas A&M AgriLife Research named four Faculty Fellows during its awards ceremony Jan. 9 at the AgriLife Center on the Texas A&M University campus in College Station. Dr. Kirk Winemiller of College Station has been named Senior Faculty Fellow, while Dr. Amir Ibrahim and Dr. Rhonda Miller, also from College Station, and Dr. Qingwu Xue of Amarillo have been named Faculty Fellows. The Faculty Fellow title becomes part of the individual’s title. AgriLife Research established the Faculty Fellows Program in 1998 to… Read More →

Second edition of The Ruminant Nutrition System published

The first edition of The Ruminant Nutrition System: An Applied Model for Predicting Nutrient Requirements and Feed Utilization in Ruminants was published in October 2016. Since then we have received much positive feedback, which has encouraged us to revise and expand it. In this second edition, we have updated concepts and added new information, clarified and enhanced the discussions of important topics, included new and improved and standardized existing graphics and illustrations, rearranged some of the text, and included indexes for subjects and authors. Although we believe this second edition… Read More →