← All People

Sapna Chitlapilly Dass

Chitlapilly Dass, Sapna
Sapna Chitlapilly Dass
Research Assistant Professor, Meat Science
Office:
Room 314A Kleberg
Email:
Phone:
979-458-8177
Undergraduate Education
B.S., Zoology, University of Madras, India
Graduate Education
M.S., Applied Microbiology, University of Madras, India
M.S., Industrial Biotechnology, Newcastle University, UK
Ph.D., Food Microbiology, Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland

Dr. Sapna Chitlapilly Dass is a research assistant professor of food microbiology in the Department of Animal Sciences. She received a B.S. in Zoology from University of Madras. She obtained her M.S. degree in Applied Microbiology from University of Madras and Industrial Biotechnology from Newcastle University. She earned her Ph.D. in Food Microbiology from Dublin Institute of Technology. Before joining the department, her prior appointments were, postdoctoral research associate in University of Nebraska- Lincoln, postdoctoral research engineer in France National center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and University of Paris VI (UPMC), Banyuls-sur-Mer, France and research internship, French National Institute for Agronomic Research (INRA), Nancy, France.

Dr Dass’s research interests are on elucidating the molecular mechanism by which food-borne pathogens interact with their surroundings, other bacteria and abiotic surfaces. In particular, her research focuses on deciphering the ecological niches of pathogens and spoilage bacteria by profiling the food production chain microbiomes. This provides insight into how pathogens and bacteria interact and survive in these niches and also helps in designing niche specific interventions. In addition, Dr. Dass is also interested in the microbial community behaviors in multi-species biofilms. The community behavior in biofilms provides understating on how biofilms persist on different food processing surfaces and their tolerance to antimicrobial chemicals and interventions. This is of particular relevance in food industry with the increasing number of food-borne outbreaks.