Category Archives: Uncategorized

Retail beef market embraces changes, new cuts for consumers

AgriLife Extension expert outlines some new options from familiar beef cuts Chuck flap, rib-eye filet, tomahawk steak, Denver or Sierra cuts, flat irons and tri tips – the landscape of the local grocery meat case is changing when it comes to beef cuts, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. As the COVID-19 pandemic brought beef shortages, consumers may have noticed some different cuts of beef when their traditional selections were sold out, said Davey Griffin, Ph.D., AgriLife Extension meat specialist in the Department of Animal Science of Texas A&M… Read More →

Prenatal stress increases skeletal muscle mitochondrial volume density and function in yearling Brahman calves

Guy, CP, CL Wellman, DG Riley, CR Long, RD Randel, TH Welsh, Jr., SH White-Springer. 2020. Abstract We previously determined that prenatal stress (PNS) differentially affected methylation of DNA from leukocytes of 28-d-old calves. Specifically, COX14 (cytochrome c oxidase (COX) assembly factor) and CKMT1B (mitochondrial creatine kinase U-type) were hypomethylated and COA5 (COX assembly factor 5), COX5A (COX subunit 5A), NRF1 (nuclear respiratory factor 1), and GSST1 (glutathione S-transferase theta-1) were hypermethylated in PNS compared to non-PNS calves (P≤0.05). Our current objective was to test the hypothesis that… Read More →

Select skeletal muscle mitochondrial measures in Thoroughbred weanlings are related to race earnings and sire

Guy, CP, CM Latham, RN Owen, AL Fowler, SH White-Springer. 2020. President’s Oral Pick: Abstract QuanPfiable, cellular differences of individuals are not widely used in breeding and training decisions in the equine industry. Our objecPve was to determine if mitochondrial parameters in weanling Thoroughbreds were related to sire or lifePme race earnings. We hypothesized that weanling skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity would be posiPvely correlated with race earnings. Gluteus medius muscle samples were collected from racing-bred Thoroughbred weanlings (n=139; mean±SD; 6.0±0.4 mo) from 40 different sires over 3 years… Read More →

A New Herd

Growing up on his father’s livestock and crop operation in Rhodesia, Dr. G. Cliff Lamb was surrounded by cattle, pigs and sheep almost from the moment he was born. The lifestyle influenced his interest in livestock reproduction and still informs his perspective today as head of the Department of Animal Science in Texas A&M University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. In Africa, Lamb also saw what can happen to food production in times of unrest. His homeland erupted into civil war from 1976 to 1979, resulting in… Read More →

Farm to fork: Texas A&M Virtual Beef Cattle Short Course has much to offer ranchers

Live cooking demonstration replaces traditional prime rib meal Finding value beyond the packer as more people look for locally sourced beef in the wake of COVID-19 is only one of the benefits of attending the Virtual Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course set for Aug. 3-5. There’s still time to register for the education-packed short course jointly hosted by  Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University. Online registration will be open until the event, with the cost $129 until the conference, and $149 after the conference… Read More →

Texas Crop and Weather Report – June 30, 2020

Joe Paschal, Ph.D., AgriLife Extension livestock specialist, Corpus Christi, said livestock are entering a period he calls the “summer slump,” where weight gains and body condition scores can dip as animals deal with the heat and declining forage quality. Paschal and Jason Banta, Ph.D., AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist, Overton, said cattle in much of the state were experiencing typical summer conditions. Rains have reduced drought levels for most of the state, but as temperatures rise, moisture levels and grazing conditions could change quickly without additional rainfall. “Overall,… Read More →

Be wary of fire danger when grilling, cooking outdoors

Most grill-related fires occur during summer, especially in JulyWhile grilling and outdoor cooking are among the great pleasures of summer, they also pose fire dangers. The months of May, June, July and August are the most active for grill-related fires, with July topping the list, according to the National Fire Protection Association, or NFPA. Grilling-related fires in Texas “Each summer, we see an increase in the number of grilling and outdoor cooking fires across the state,” said Weldon Dent, wildland urban interface specialist with the Texas A&M Forest Service…. Read More →

Sheep, goat market update amid COVID-19 topic of June 11 online meeting

The Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in San Angelo will present its fourth online meeting on the impact of COVID-19 on sheep and goat markets June 11. The event will use the Zoom video meeting platform starting at 3 p.m. Participants need to download Zoom to their computer or smart phone in advance of the meeting to preregister. Once preregistered, participants will be given the meeting link and have the option to join online or by phone. This event is free and open to the public…. Read More →

Texas 4-H makes additional preparations for safe summer camps

Additional cleaning, mobile check-in, limiting equipment use among enhanced safety measures The Texas 4-H Conference Center in Brownwood is making changes to its various summer camps as a means to protect attendees and camp workers from the coronavirus. Texas 4-H is the youth development component of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, an educational outreach agency of the Texas A&M University System. Each year, the center offers a variety of fun and educational summer camps focused on helping youth develop important life skills. “We are still planning on… Read More →

Cattle fever tick numbers on the rise

AgriLife experts warn of ticks’ potential negative economic impact Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service are working to help thwart the spread of cattle fever. An announcement from the Texas Animal Health Commission, TAHC, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program, USDA-CFTEP, that cattle fever tick infestations have spread outside the permanent quarantine zone prompted concern from AgriLife experts, who last dealt with a large outbreak in 2017. “The discovery of more fever tick infestations, particularly outside of the… Read More →