Category Archives: Uncategorized

AgriLife Extension hires beef specialist for Texas Plains

By Kay Ledbetter AMARILLO — Jason Smith has been named as the new Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist in Amarillo, serving the High Plains, South Plains and Rolling Plains. He began Sept. 1. Smith, who is also an assistant professor in the Texas A&M University department of animal science, previously held the same Extension title with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture in Knoxville. “We are excited to have Jason join our faculty and to provide leadership in the area of beef cattle nutrition… Read More →

Tame Your Selection Criteria

By Natalie Jones You keep looking to beef quality, maternal and feed efficiency for herd improvement. What about docility? Research says it may have more impact than you realize. A study by Gordon Carstens’ team at Texas A&M University with feedlot Angus, Brangus, Braford and Simbra heifers found the share grading Choice or higher was 63.5% for calm temperaments, compared to 55.5% for their excitable pen mates. Based on weights and USDA’s three-year-average grid, the calm advantage was $56 per head. The study compared feedyard and carcass performance… Read More →

TAMU International Horsemanship – Slovenia and Italy

Texas A&M International Horsemanship took to the international road again in May 2019. Drs. Jessica Leatherwood and Chelsie Huseman, along with three students, traveled to Slovenia and Italy to conduct horsemanship clinics for both youth and adults. Undergraduate students Carly Fronckowiak, a junior Agricultural Systems Management major, Jarrett Haydon, a senior Agricultural Systems Management major, and Katie Wright, a junior Animal Science major, conducted three-day and four-day horsemanship clinics overseas. All three students were Texas A&M Summer Horsemanship School instructors in the summer of 2018 and used their… Read More →

TAMU International Horsemanship – China

First stop, China! Texas A&M joined forces with Unbridled China to bring horsemanship schools to both Beijing and Shanghai. Animal Science faculty member Dr. Jessica Leatherwood and Horse Program Specialist Chelsie Huseman, along with TAMU undergraduate student Zach Haydon, headed to China March 14-21, 2018 to conduct multiple horsemanship schools. “We are excited to be kicking off this endeavor with China” says Huseman. “It was an informative experience to engage in their unique horse industry and culture and to share some of our horsemanship education.” Student Zach Haydon… Read More →

Fever ticks found in northern Jim Wells County

By: Roland Rodriguez JIM WELLS COUNTY — The Texas Animal Health Commission, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program, have established a County Fever Tick-Control Purpose Quarantine Area in northern Jim Wells County in order to eliminate the pest and prevent the spread of fever ticks. The TAHC first set up a quarantine in Jim Wells county in November of 2017. More than 13,000 acres now are under quarantine. Earlier this month the ticks were discovered when a cattle buyer had the animals voluntarily… Read More →

Differential skeletal muscle mitochondrial characteristics of weanling racing-bred horses

By Christine M Latham, Clara K Fenger, Dr. Sarah H White Abstract Responses of equine skeletal muscle characteristics to growth and training have been shown to differ between breeds. These differential responses may arise in part because muscle fiber type and mitochondrial density differ between breeds, even in untrained racing-bred horses. However, it is not known when these breed-specific differences manifest. To test the hypothesis that weanling Standardbreds (SB) and Thoroughbreds (TB) would have higher mitochondrial measures than Quarter Horses (QH), gluteus medius samples were collected from SB (mean… Read More →

The weight of labor issues on animal welfare

By Courtney Daigle Producers face challenges in recruiting and retaining stockpeople. There are two job openings for each applicant, and much of the agricultural workforce is composed of immigrants. Immigration reform is making it difficult to generate a sustainable agricultural workforce, even as the U.S. demand for foreign labor has increased fivefold in the past 13 years. To overcome these challenges, producers are identifying out-of-the-box solutions including alternative labor sources (e.g., prison inmates) and are quick to implement new technology that makes managing more animals easier and more… Read More →

Youth track to be featured as part of Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course

By Blair Fannin COLLEGE STATION – The Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course Aug. 5-7 at Texas A&M University in College Station will include a youth track featuring a number of educational sessions. A tour of the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences will be one of the highlights along with a meat laboratory experience that includes smoking cooked beef products. The youth track program is open to students ages 13 to 18 and is limited to 45 registrants. Early registration is encouraged to secure… Read More →

AgriLife Research beef cattle physiologist Randel retires

OVERTON – Dr. Ron Randel, Texas A&M AgriLife Research physiologist, announced his retirement after more than four decades of beef cattle research and teaching. Randel said he left a good position with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service in 1974 to join AgriLife Research. He enjoyed the research aspect of the USDA job, but longed to teach outside the classroom. “What was lacking was the ability to work with and mentor grad students,” he said. “It’s the primary reason I took this post.” He was part… Read More →

Beefing Up Cattle

By Ashli Villarreal Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences professor Tom Welsh’s research focuses on how Brahman cattle respond to stress will impact both the health of the animal and the health of the industry. Many American beef producers raise Angus-dominated herds, but as worldwide temperatures increase, there will be an increased need for tropically adapted animals. Brahman cattle do well in hot, humid climates, but they are often criticized for their negative and aggressive reactions to humans. Crossbred cattle in the Gulf Coast… Read More →