Tag Archives: Tryon Wickersham

Beef’s greatest talent is protein upcycling

By Lacey Newlin, 580-748-1892, lnewlin@hpj.com “There are some really highly educated people out there who are actively against the beef industry,” said Tryon Wickersham, associate professor of animal nutrition at Texas A&M University. “I don’t think there is going to be anything we can do to change that. I think they will be against everything we do, no matter how we do it, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t mount a defense or stop educating the consumers about the value we bring to their plates.” Wickersham spoke recently… Read More →

Cattle production offers sound environmental ‘hoof print’

By Jennifer M. Latzke The proposed “Green New Deal” has thrown a lot of focus onto cattle lately—a plan that would limit cattle production to an extent in an effort to curb their greenhouse gas “hoof print.” But recently released research quantifies the role cattle play in the natural carbon cycle, and how they serve an upcycling purpose in turning feedstocks into higher value protein that humans can eat Baseline measurements Al Rotz is an an agricultural engineer with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Ag Research Service and… Read More →

Cattle Are “Up-Cyclers”

By: John Maday Among all the discussion about efficiency and sustainability in food production, beef’s critics often leave out a critical point—cattle eat things we cannot. They turn grass, corn stalks, wheat straw and byproducts such as distillers’ grains and cottonseed meal into high-quality protein for human consumption. While it also is true cattle eat products such as corn and soybean meal, which could be used in human diets, analysis indicates beef has a good story to tell regarding the ratio of human-edible nutrients invested to human-edible nutrients… Read More →