Tag Archives: Nutrition

Stockpiled forages reduce need, cost of hay, supplemental feed

Writer: Adam Russell, 903-834-6191, adam.russell@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jason Banta, 903-834-6191, jpbanta@ag.tamu.edu OVERTON – Stockpiled forages and winter annuals can reduce the need for and cost of hay and other supplemental feed for beef cattle producers in regions with adequate annual rainfall, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Dr. Jason Banta, AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist, Overton, said producers can reduce the need for hay and supplements by providing stockpiled forage mid-November through December and winter annuals October through May. “If they choose these options, we want them… Read More →

Dr. Luis Tedeschi receives AFIA Award in Ruminant Nutrition Research

Contact: Kim Schoonmaker, ASAS Scientific Communications Associate Dr. Luis Tedeschi, Professor of Animal Nutrition in the Department of Animal Science at Texas A&M University, is the recipient of the AFIA Award in Ruminant Nutrition Research. Dr. Tedeschi received a bachelor’s degree in Agronomy Engineering from the University of São Paulo (USP-Brazil) in 1991, his master’s degree in Animal and Forage Sciences from the USP in 1996, and his doctorate in Animal Science from Cornell University (NY) in 2001. Following a Research Associate position at Cornell University from 2002 to… Read More →

AgriLife Research projects evaluate feeder cattle on yeast-grain diet

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Luis Tedeschi, 979-845-1541, luis.tedeschi@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Yeast is a staple ingredient found in many breads, but it also could play a major role in feeding cattle and producing higher quality beef. Dr. Luis Tedeschi, Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow, and graduate student Whitney Crossland are studying the effects of yeast as part of an extensive fed-cattle study. The study is in partnership with AB Vista of the United Kingdom. The goal of the project is to determine if yeast… Read More →

Doctoral candidate Smith receives trio of awards

Writer: Adam Russell, 903-834-6191, adam.russell@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Brandon Smith, 979-845-3041, wbsmith89@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION — William “Brandon” Smith, a doctoral candidate in the Texas A&M University department of soil and crop sciences in College Station and the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in Overton, is racking up awards as he approaches graduation. At the recent Texas A&M AgriLife Conference, Smith was awarded the 2016 Vice Chancellor’s Award in Excellence for Graduate Student Research as well as the 2016 Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Special Achievement Award for… Read More →

U.S. decline in meat protein consumption raises concern for Texas A&M scientist

Meat from animals critical for good health and development Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Guoyao Wu, 979-845-1541, g-wu@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – A 14 percent decline in U.S. consumer meat consumption over the past decade has caused alarm with one Texas A&M AgriLife scientist who warns the effects could be dire for overall human health and child development. Dr. Guoyao Wu, distinguished professor in the department of animal science at Texas A&M University, said U.S. consumers have been overwhelmed with misinformation about protein and fats in meats,… Read More →

Providing proper nutrition for wintering cows can pay dividends long-term

Writer: Adam Russell, 903-834-6191, adam.russell@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jason Banta, 903-834-6191, jpbanta@ag.tamu.edu OVERTON – Providing forage and feed supplies with the proper nutritional value for cows is an important consideration for producers as winter approaches, said Dr. Jason Banta, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist, Overton. Testing hay for quality can provide information producers need to meet the nutritional requirements of cows and keep them in good condition through the winter, Banta said. By determining the hay supply’s crude protein content and total digestible nutrients, or TDN,… Read More →

Algae Could be the Key to Climate-Friendly Meat

By: Natasha Geiling In December of 2015, nearly 200 nations met in Paris and agreed to hold global temperature increase well below 2 degrees Celsius. The agreement was widely lauded as an important first step in averting the catastrophic consequences of climate change, but came with its own set of caveats. For the world to truly stall temperature rise well below 2 degrees Celsius, every nation would need to make massive changes to their energy, transportation, and manufacturing sectors in the coming decades. Renewable energy would need to be… Read More →

Tedeschi reciprocal technical-scientific visit to Southern Vietnam

Writer: Luis Tedeschi, 979-845-5062, luis.tedeschi@tamu.edu Dr. Luis Tedeschi visited Ho Chi Minh city in Southern Vietnam from February 20 to 27, 2016 as part of a reciprocal technical-scientific visit through the Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program, funded by the United States Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service, and awarded to the Borlaug Institute of International Agriculture (http://borlaug.tamu.edu/). Drs. Tedeschi and Carstens hosted and mentored Dr. Trung, a ruminant nutritionist, from the Institute of Animal Science for Southern Vietnam during August 24 to November… Read More →

Applied nutrition modeling producing beef more profitably, helping reduce methane emissions in feedlots

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Luis Tedeschi, 979-845-5062, luis.tedeschi@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Nutritional modeling systems developed in the department of animal science at Texas A&M University have helped participating Texas feedlot operators keep feed costs in check and produce beef more profitably. Now, these models have the potential to be applied to help reduce greenhouse emissions, according to researchers. Dr. Luis Tedeschi, Texas A&M AgriLife Research nutritionist and associate professor in the department of animal science, has extensively studied decision support systems, specifically nutritional modeling. While a doctoral… Read More →