Tag Archives: Meat

Aging at home

By Dr. Jeff Savell and Dr. Kerri Gehring COLLEGE STATION, Texas – Over the past two decades, there has been an increased interest in the dry- aging process driven primarily from restaurateurs and retailers seeking unique ways to market their product. While there have been several scientific and review articles about dry aging during this time period, dry aging is still considered more of an art form where parameters have been developed mostly through trial and error rather than scientific or technical methods. Because of the great interest… Read More →

SXSW BBQ Panel Recap

Texas A&M’s South by Southwest panels look to the future Aggie offerings delve into the scientific issues behind human rights, health care…and BBQ By Steve Kuhlmann, steve.kuhlmann@theeagle.com Barbecue enthusiasts were treated to a more than 45-minute panel with the “brisketeers” — Texas A&M professor Jeff Savell, AgriLife Extension meat specialist Davey Griffin and Rosenthal Meat Center manager Ray Riley — and author and cook Jess Pryles, who shared with the audience some of the principles they look for in meat and how their interest has built a community… Read More →

Grass-fed beef conference set for May 31-June 1 at Texas A&M

Niche markets, consumer preferences, forage systems to be discussed Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Ron Gill, 979-845-3579, rgill@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Producers interested in learning more about grass-fed beef as well as potential marketing opportunities will receive in-depth instruction at a May 31-June 1 conference at Texas A&M University in College Station. “This is a comprehensive program covering all aspects of grass-fed beef production,” said Dr. Ron Gill, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist in College Station and conference instructor. “We will discuss cattle types best… Read More →

Experts: Use safe practices when processing, cooking feral hogs

Parasites, such as hookworms can be found in feral hogs Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contacts: Dr. Tom Hairgrove, 979-845-5419, tbhairgrove@tamu.edu Dr. Tom Craig, 979-845-3414, thomas.craig@tvmdl.tamu.edu Dr. Dan Hale, 979-845-3935, dhale@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – With a proliferation of feral hogs in Texas, control measures such as trapping and hunting can yield the rewards of good table fare. However, feral hogs can carry  parasites, such as hookworms, and experts advise to use safe cooking practices before consuming the meat. “Feral hogs are destructive in nature and their daily patterns include both feeding and fighting,”… Read More →

Texas A&M AgriLife, Colorado State team up for beef export project

University researchers developing industry best practices Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Russell Cross, 979-845-1541, hrcross@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Texas A&M AgriLife and Colorado State University researchers are teaming up to evaluate production practice risks to beef trade, develop educational materials and programs to assist producers with meeting requirements for exporting to China, and helping the U.S. beef industry capitalize on future export trade revenue. The U.S. Department of Agriculture-Foreign Agricultural Service has awarded Texas A&M Agrilife Research and Colorado State University $750,000 to develop the program. “One purpose… Read More →

What are big carcasses doing to the future of the beef industry?

Large carcasses are forcing retailers to cut more of the middle-meat steaks thinner to meet package and cost restrictions. Does that move the beef business away from consumer preferences? Commentary by Dr. H. Russell Cross, hrcross@tamu.edu, 979-862-1705 It’s a conundrum that has long plagued the beef business—what’s economically necessary for producers presents big challenges for wholesalers, retailers and most importantly, consumers. Over the past several decades, the genetic direction of the nation’s cowherd has been driving us to bigger and bigger cattle. That, in turn, drives bigger and… Read More →

Camp Brisket helps novice pitmasters feed masses

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jeff Savell, 979-845-3992, j-savell@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Nothing beats good brisket and Texas barbecue, but smoking brisket on a barbecue pit can be a daunting task for the novice. “I love barbecuing in general, but the brisket is a very intimidating cut of beef,” said David Nelson of Austin, who attended Camp Brisket recently at Texas A&M University in College Station. The program attracted more than 60 attendees who entered a lottery system and won a ticket to the two-day event that organizers… Read More →

Meat Judging Team completes successful semester

Writer: Dr. Leslie Frenzel Members of the 2017 Fightin’ Texas Aggie Meat Judging Team recently completed their intercollegiate meat judging careers. This is a proud moment for each of them because they have dedicated their hearts and souls to competing on a national stage to represent themselves and Texas A&M University for a demanding 15 months. While balancing their academics, practice, family, and social lives, the team was tenacious enough to finish an extremely successful competitive year as only one of three teams to finish in the top… Read More →

Fourth Texas Barbecue Town Hall meeting features discussions of meat trends

Media contact: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jeff Savell, 979-845-3992 , j-savell@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Texas barbecue owners and pitmasters from across the Lone Star state gathered at Texas A&M University in College Station recently for the Fourth Texas Barbecue Town Hall meeting. About 50 people were in attendance, receiving updates on livestock and meat markets for beef, pork, chicken and turkey by Dr. David Anderson, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service livestock marketing economist in College Station. Anderson said demand continues to be steady for U.S. beef. “Overall, 2017… Read More →

Cattle are now so big that restaurants and grocery stores need new ways to cut steaks

If you’ve dined at a steakhouse recently or grilled rib-eye for dinner, you may have noticed a curious trend: Steaks are getting thinner. As U.S. beef cattle have ballooned in size, experts say, restaurants, grocery stores and meat processors have had to get creative in how they slice and dice them up. Increasingly, that means thinner steaks – as well as more scrap meat and “alternative” cuts designed to make the most of a bigger animal. The cattle industry argues that it provides cheaper and more plentiful beef… Read More →