Tag Archives: livestock

Bull selection includes muscle potential

By Dr. Joe Paschal, j-paschal@tamu.edu, 361-265-9203 The mesquite is beginning to leaf out and that has always been a sure sign of one thing – spring. Spring in South Texas and the Gulf Coast is when most of our herds calve and when many of us buy replacement bulls (actually I bought mine in December but hang with me here). Most of us still sell our calves at weaning so besides a sound footed, fertile, and easy calving bull, well-muscled bulls are always in high demand. In the… Read More →

Important By-Products Derived From Cattle

Many of us enjoy a good steak or a juicy hamburger and realize the nutritional benefits derived from eating beef but there are countless products that we use in in our daily lives that are derived from cattle that we never think about. Dan Hale is a professor and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Meat Specialist. “I take students on tours of retail grocery stores and I say go find beef in this grocery store and every single aisle that they could walk into at any local grocery store… Read More →

Judging teams successful at multiple contests

The Department of Animal Science competitive judging teams have hit the ground running this semester between the long hours of practice they have put in and contests they have traveled to. The meat judging team kicked things off at the American Meat Science Association Southwestern Intercollegiate Meat Judging Contest in Fort Worth on Feb. 3. They placed third in the contest with Layne Mustian placing fifth overall individually. Texas Tech University won the contest by 56 points. Kansas State University came in second. The aggies again places third… Read More →

2018 ANSC Brazil Study Abroad: Comparative Ruminant Production

Writers: Jordan Adams and Madeline Rivera It is every college student’s dream to have the opportunity to participate in a study abroad.  Visit a foreign country, learn a different language, experience another culture, make new friends, and learn something that we never knew about ourselves. During the summer of 2018, nine animal science students and one biomedical science student had the opportunity to study abroad in Brazil. The objective of the study abroad was to compare ruminant production schemes in the northeastern and southeastern regions of Brazil to… Read More →

64th Beef Cattle Short Course kicks off at Texas A&M

By: Courtney Carpenter COLLEGE STATION, Tex. (KBTX) – 2,200 ranchers from seven different countries are in College Station for the Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course. Ranchers will get the market outlook and learn about the long term forecast; all with the idea that it will make the beef you buy better. Donnell Brown is a fifth generation rancher from Throckmorton, Texas. He’s made the trip to The Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course every year for more than a decade. “It’s good to get together and discuss and… Read More →

64th Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course Aug. 6-8 in College Station

Writer/Media Contact: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jason Cleere, 979-845-6931, jjcleere@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – The 64th Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course Aug. 6-8 at Texas A&M University in College Station will highlight a cattle market outlook as well as issues affecting beef producers. The short course is the largest beef cattle educational event in the country and attracts more than 1,600 beef cattle producers from Texas and abroad, according to organizers. The short course is hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the department of animal… Read More →

Cow with better body condition has stronger calving process

Writer: Dr. Joe Paschal, 361-265-9203, joe.paschal@ag.tamu.edu Body condition scoring refers to evaluating the amount of body fat in a cow (or any other animal). Under normal grazing conditions, cows carrying more body fat are more efficient because they are more adapted to their environment. Cows (and bulls) that are more adapted to their environment are more fertile and productive. The value of body condition scoring has been known since at least the early 1960s when Dr. J. N. Wiltbank reported that cows in better body condition, or that were… Read More →

AgriLife Research to study prenatal stress impacts in cattle

Writer: Adam Russell, 903-834-6191, adam.russell@ag.tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Ron Randel, 903-834-6191, ron.randel@ag.tamu.edu OVERTON – A $382,800 federal grant will fund research to identify the impacts of prenatal stress on beef cattle DNA, white blood cells, other tissue and subsequent changes in genetics related to temperament, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist. Dr. Ron Randel, AgriLife Research physiologist, said the three-year grant will finance research focused on the “effect of prenatal stress on DNA methylation and correspondence with gene expression in cattle” at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center in… Read More →

Both data, visual aspects of cattle count when making purchases

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Jason Cleere, 979-845-6931, jjcleere@tamu.edu FORT WORTH  – When buying female replacement cattle or breeding bulls, it’s important to use data and visual observations to make the best selections, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Dr. Jason Cleere, beef cattle specialist from College Station, gave a series of demonstrations on conformation at the recent Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association Convention in Fort Worth advising the best methods for buying replacements. “If I look at what the cow looks like visually… Read More →

The forgotten goat has grown in popularity

Writer: Dr. Joe Paschal, 361-265-9203, joe.paschal@ag.tamu.edu As I drive up and down the roads of South and Central Texas, I often see a pasture with goats, mostly Boers now. In the late 1980s, when I was still a young extension specialist, C. Wayne Hanselka, extension range specialist (now retired), and I decided to compile as much information about meat goat production as possible from folks in the business at that time. Other than dairy breeds and Angoras, goats back then were called “Spanish.” The Boers (“Boer” means “farmer” in… Read More →