Tag Archives: Joe Paschal

Fever ticks found in northern Jim Wells County

By: Roland Rodriguez JIM WELLS COUNTY — The Texas Animal Health Commission, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program, have established a County Fever Tick-Control Purpose Quarantine Area in northern Jim Wells County in order to eliminate the pest and prevent the spread of fever ticks. The TAHC first set up a quarantine in Jim Wells county in November of 2017. More than 13,000 acres now are under quarantine. Earlier this month the ticks were discovered when a cattle buyer had the animals voluntarily… Read More →

Today’s youth train to become tomorrow’s beef cattle producers

COLLEGE STATION — The youth track for the 2019 Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course, held recently in College Station, gave real-world experience, hours of education and a beef quality assurance certification to 30 youth interested in expanding their beef cattle knowledge.  “One goal for our youth track is to allow students to have a hands-on experience with the beef industry,” said Victoria Heller, youth track co-facilitator and Texas Beef Council industry outreach manager, Austin. “This allows them to discover aspects of our industry they may not be familiar… Read More →

Lab-grown ‘meat’ far from real deal

By Joe C. Paschal There has been much concern among livestock producers about research and commercial laboratories growing muscle fibers and their plans to market them as meat, specifically “clean” meat, in direct competition with the safe, wholesome, true meat we raise. Meat is defined as “the flesh of an animal,” especially a mammal, used as food. Promotion by livestock producers in the U.S. and the world and the growth in the world’s economy and population is projected to increase the demand for meat 73% by 2050. Livestock… Read More →

African Swine Fever outbreak could devastate US swine herd

By Joe Paschal African Swine Fever (ASF as it is commonly referred to) has been in the news recently as a result of an outbreak in China. It is a major health threat to swine production in many countries, but fortunately it is not in the United States. ASF is a highly contagious viral disease that causes death in domestic and wild pigs of all ages. Symptoms include high fever, decreased appetite and weakness, red, blotchy skin or skin lesions; diarrhea and vomiting; and coughing and difficulty in… Read More →

Texas has the largest cow herds in the US

By Rolan Rodriguez Now  beef cattle numbers in the state are the largest in the country for the first time in years. Unfortunately for those who love steak and hamburgers, the expanding herd size hasn’t translated into dropping the retail prices. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension beef cattle specialist Dr. Joe Paschal says Texas has the largest cow herd in the U.S., including cattle, calves, and dairy cattle. He estimates the total at about 94 million head. “Right now, based on the number of heifers that are entering the feed… Read More →

Bull selection includes muscle potential

By Dr. Joe Paschal, j-paschal@tamu.edu, 361-265-9203 The mesquite is beginning to leaf out and that has always been a sure sign of one thing – spring. Spring in South Texas and the Gulf Coast is when most of our herds calve and when many of us buy replacement bulls (actually I bought mine in December but hang with me here). Most of us still sell our calves at weaning so besides a sound footed, fertile, and easy calving bull, well-muscled bulls are always in high demand. In the… Read More →

Stretching limited hay supplies

By Dr. Joe Paschal, j-paschal@tamu.edu, 361-265-9203 It seems counterintuitive that you might need to consider a strategy to stretch your hay supply this winter considering all the moisture we have had recently, but a lot of hay was fed early this past summer and not much made since then. My colleague in east Texas, where the dry spell was more severe, recently wrote two bulletins about doing just that. Jason Banta, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Beef Cattle Specialist in Overton, sent them to me, and for some… Read More →

7 Things Every Small Cattle Producer Should Know

By Dr. Joe Paschal, j-paschal@tamu.edu, 361-265-9203 The other day, I was reading a paper written by a former colleague, Rick Machen titled “Seven Things Every Small Producer Should Know,” and I thought it was worth covering the points he made here. It can be accessed at beef.tamu.edu under “Publications.” Size is relative in Texas. According to the 2012 USDA Census of Agriculture, the most recent survey, almost half of the state’s cowherd is in herds of 100 head or more, but they represent less than 10 percent of farms and… Read More →

Cow with better body condition has stronger calving process

Writer: Dr. Joe Paschal, 361-265-9203, joe.paschal@ag.tamu.edu Body condition scoring refers to evaluating the amount of body fat in a cow (or any other animal). Under normal grazing conditions, cows carrying more body fat are more efficient because they are more adapted to their environment. Cows (and bulls) that are more adapted to their environment are more fertile and productive. The value of body condition scoring has been known since at least the early 1960s when Dr. J. N. Wiltbank reported that cows in better body condition, or that were… Read More →

Horn flies can damage cattle skin, need to be controlled

Writer: Dr. Joe Paschal, 361-265-9203, joe.paschal@ag.tamu.edu The other day when I was turning out the cows to a rested pasture full of green grass and winter weeds, I noticed many of them had several horn flies and other cows had quite a few. I guess it is going to be an early season. The horn fly, which seems to be a misnomer since they congregate on cattle without horns, too, were introduced to the U.S. from Europe in the late 1800s. They were called horn fly because they clustered… Read More →