Category Archives: Faculty

Dr. Gary Williams named ASAS fellow

Dr. Gary L. Williams is a recipient of the 2017 American Society of Animal Science (ASAS) Fellow Award —Research Category. The Fellow Award was presented to seven individuals during the ASAS-CSAS Annual Meeting & Trade Show held in Baltimore, Maryland, July 8-12. Dr. Williams is a Regents Fellow, Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow, and Professor, Texas A&M AgriLife Research-Beeville and Department of Animal Science, Texas A&M University-College Station. Dr. Williams is nationally and internationally recognized for his research with beef cattle, including the neuroendocrinology and physiology of suckling-mediated anovulation, the role… Read More →

Selection Considerations to Improve Longevity

By Associate Professor & Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Beef Cattle Specialist, Jason Banta, PhD., PAS Every cow-calf producer wants a cow that is productive for 12 to 15 years or more. Longevity of both cows and bulls is influenced by a host of factors including disposition, feet and legs, udder and teat confirmation, fleshing ability, fertility, function of reproductive organs (e.g. lazy prepuces in bulls), and breed just to name a few. The ability to wean an acceptable calf every year is the primary factor affecting longevity of… Read More →

Gill appointed as interim department head of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications

Dr. Mark Hussey announced today that Dr. Clare Gill will be serving as the new interim department head of Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications, effective August 1, 2017. Dr. Gill completed her Ph.D. from University of Adeliade, located in Australia, in molecular genetics. Her bachelor’s degree in biotechnology is from Flinders University of South Australia. She joined the Texas A&M Department of Animal Science in 1999 and currently serves as a Professor of Animal Genomics. Additionally, she just completed a term as the Faculty Ombuds officer for Texas… Read More →

RMC goes off without a hitch

Last month, the American Meat Science Association held the 70th annual Reciprocal Meat Conference on the Texas A&M Campus. The Department of Animal Science hosted over 850 meat science students and professionals who participated in a number of activities from June 16th to 21st. Pre-conference activities at the Rosenthal and Kleberg Centers included a processed meats contest, iron chef competition, meat judging coaches’ clinic, and Jimmy T. Keeton Processed Meats Workshop. The Memorial Student Center housed the student poster and quiz bowl competitions along with the bulk of… Read More →

Forrest named advisor of the year

Dr. David Forrest was recently recognized for his leadership of the TAMU Saddle & Sirloin Club by being named the 2016-2017 Advisor of the Year for an Affiliated Student Organization. The purpose of this award is to recognize and reward individuals who have clearly distinguished themselves by providing exemplary guidance, support and dedication to the advisement of a recognized student organization at Texas A&M University. The award was presented at the 2017 Division of Student Affairs Awards Ceremony and included a check in the amount of $100 to the Saddle &… Read More →

Barbecue Summer Camp teaches finer aspects of smoking meat

Writer: Blair Fannin, 979-845-2259, b-fannin@tamu.edu Contact: Dr. Davey Griffin, 979-845-3935, dgriff@tamu.edu COLLEGE STATION – Who says summer camp is just for youth? At Texas A&M University, adults flocked to summer barbecue camp in College Station by the hundreds to find out how to cook great beef brisket, pork ribs, chicken and other cuts of meat suited best for the pit. Barbecue Summer Camp is so popular that a lottery system has been put in place to handle registration, according to organizers. The camp, sponsored by Foodways Texas and… Read More →

5 tips to keep your cattle safe in the summer heat

As sizzling summer temperatures settle in, do these five things to ward off heat stress in your herd. Writer: Amanda Radke, BEEF Daily In my neck of the woods, the wind, heat and lack of rain are creating the perfect storm for a drought. Folks further west of our ranch are already selling pairs as they run short of pasture and feed. Summer is in full swing, and as the temperatures reach scorching heights, it’s time to start thinking about ways to keep the cowherd safe and comfortable…. Read More →

Equine faculty and students attend industry symposium

Writer: Chelsie Huseman, 979-845-5264, chelsiejo@tamu.edu The Equine section of the Animal Science department attended the 25th Symposium of the Equine Science Society hosted by the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN on May 30-June 2. Several graduate students presented or had a poster representing their research at the symposium. Emily Dickson presented in the Production and Management category. Kalley Fikes presented in Exercise Science and Meghan O’Neill presented in Reproductive Physiology and both received 2nd in the graduate student competition in their respective categories. Allison Millican and Mallory… Read More →

Manage cattle for dry year

Writer: Dr. Joe Paschal, 361-265-9203, j-paschal@tamu.edu My cattle wintered well, and I had a nice calf crop this spring, but with the heat and humidity of summer, I am anxious for a nice rain. The grass is crispy in the middle of the pastures even though there is still quite a bit of standing green. Some of you are in better shape than I am, but some of you are worse. I saw quite a bit of hay being fed in the late spring and early summer, which… Read More →

Faculty Profile: Dr. Andy Herring

Dr. Andy Herring, professor and holder of the John K. Riggs ’41 Beef Cattle Professorship in the Department of Animal Science, grew up near Talpa, Texas, on the border of Runnels and Coleman counties on a ranch that has been in his family since 1886. He earned his first dollar mowing his neighbor’s lawn, although he worked on the ranch with his dad long before then. It was not until later in life that his dad actually paid him for his help. Andy does credit his parents as… Read More →