Second edition of The Ruminant Nutrition System published

The first edition of The Ruminant Nutrition System: An Applied Model for Predicting Nutrient Requirements and Feed Utilization in Ruminants was published in October 2016. Since then we have received much positive feedback, which has encouraged us to revise and expand it. In this second edition, we have updated concepts and added new information, clarified and enhanced the discussions of important topics, included new and improved and standardized existing graphics and illustrations, rearranged some of the text, and included indexes for subjects and authors.

Although we believe this second edition of The Ruminant Nutrition System is a lot more inclusive and complete, we are not content to stop here. We must be alert, always seeking for new ideas and how to implement them. Some branches of sciences experience rapid progress because of their economic relevance, as well as the pace of their development and application of novel technologies. One example of such progress is the ability to manipulate microorganisms genomically to produce biofuel more efficiently and in a more sustainable way. For example, Davidi et al. (2016) successfully added a laccase, or lignin-degrading enzymes, from the aerobic bacterium Thermobifida fusca into a designer cellulosome, a multienzyme complex structure commonly found in anaerobic bacteria. The resultant chimera had the ability to degrade cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin simultaneously. This use of laccase may be an early example of the rapid application of this long-known enzyme (Claus, 2004; Thurston, 1994) in biofuel production and other industries, such as pulp and paper and crop biotechnology. Applications of such technology in ruminant nutrition might yield enormous benefits not yet realized, even though its adoption may not happen in the near future. This technology may eventually change the way we understand indigestible dietary compounds. Rapid scientific developments such as this pose an interesting challenge for nutrition modeling. They require nutritionists to be constantly aware of discoveries and determine how to adopt them in the livestock industry. It is imperative that nutrition modeling follow the same pace of technological evolution and be responsive to new breakthroughs.

About the authors:

Luis Tedeschi is a professor in the Department of Animal Science at the Texas A&M University. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Agronomy Engineering and Master of Science degree in Animal and Forage Sciences from the University of São Paulo (Piracicaba, Brazil), and his Doctor of Philosophy degree in Animal Science from Cornell University (Ithaca, NY). His research focuses on the integration of accumulated scientific knowledge of ruminant nutrition into mathematical models to solve contemporary problems. The nutrition models he has developed are being used to develop more efficient production systems while reducing resource use and impact on the environment. He has published more than 200 articles in peer-reviewed journals and book chapters, and presented at more than 80 modeling nutrition conferences and workshops worldwide. Tedeschi is a Texas A&M AgriLife Research Faculty Fellow and the recipient of the 2017 American Feed Industry Association in Ruminant Nutrition Research award. He has served on a committee at the 2016 National Research Council of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to revise the 1996 nutrient requirements for beef cattle.

© Jon Reis / www.jonreis.com

Danny Fox is a professor emeritus of the Department of Animal Science at Cornell University. He received his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from The Ohio State University. His 35 years of research focused on the development of data, methods, models, and computer programs to accurately predict cattle nutrient requirements, as well as nutrients derived from feeds to meet cattle requirements in unique production situations worldwide. His team at Cornell developed the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System cattle nutrition model and software, which has users in more than 42 countries, for formulating rations for beef and dairy cattle. Fox has been a member of numerous national committees, including National Research Council committees on Animal Nutrition, Feed Intake, and the 1996 Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle. His growth and energy reserves models were adapted by both the 1996 Beef Cattle National Research Council committee and the 2001 Dairy Cattle National Research Council committee. He conducted many workshops on the use of these models in the United States, Canada, South America, and Europe.

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For more information regarding news from the Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Texas A&M University, please contact Maggie Tucker at maggie.tucker@tamu.edu or (979) 845-1542.

 

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